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Plover Scar Lighthouse added to Lighthouses in North West by markas on 03/02/2021

small parking area at the end of Slack Lane, turn left, track is a bit rough but manageable. Short walk up the coast and you can find plenty of places to take off.

Land owner permission not required.

View and discuss this location in more detail on Grey Arrows.

Co-ordinates: 53.98151, -2.882727 • what3words: ///dishing.shoulders.today

The originator declared that this location was not inside a Flight Restriction Zone at the time of being flown on 21/04/2019. It remains the responsibility of any pilot to check for any changes before flying at the same location.

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Gummers How, Lake District (By The1stHill)

Land owner permission requirements unknown.

View and discuss this location on Grey Arrows.

Co-ordinates: 54.28828, -2.937813 • what3words: ///shields.shelters.clinking

South Walney (By The1stHill)

Land owner permission requirements unknown.

View and discuss this location on Grey Arrows.

Co-ordinates: 54.05584, -3.216934 • what3words: ///irritable.cluttered.claps

Devils Bridge, Kirkby Lonsdale (By Itsupyoursleeve)

A great place to visit any time of year. The dog friendly Kirkby Lonsdale Brewery (The Royal Barn) is a must if you like beer, coffee & cake.
https://youtu.be/du5_56TQswo

Land owner permission requirements unknown.

View and discuss this location on Grey Arrows.

Co-ordinates: 54.19811, -2.591808 • what3words: ///support.risky.galloped

Wotton-under-Edge BT Tower (By clinkadink)

Parking and TOAL was in front of the gate of the tower, on the side of the road. It looks derelict, but apparently it's still active.

Wotton-under-Edge BT Tower is a telecommunication tower built of reinforced concrete at Wotton-under-Edge in Gloucestershire, UK. Wotton-under-Edge BT Tower is one of the few British towers built of reinforced concrete.

http://www.dgsys.co.uk/btmicrowave/sites/218.php

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wotton-under-Edge_BT_Tower

Land owner permission not required.

View and discuss this location on Grey Arrows.

Co-ordinates: 51.64931, -2.304078 • what3words: ///life.payout.unsettled

Uley Bury Hillfort (By clinkadink)

Parking was in a lay-by on Fort Road, South of the hillfort. TOAL was from the top.

Uley Bury is a sub-rectangular Iron Age bivallate hill-fort. There are three entrances to the fort, the main one in the north. The earthwork is mutilated in places by later quarrying. Finds from the camp include a Dobunic gold stater, a quern of Roman date and a bronze mask. Trial excavations at the east entrance in 1976 also found an Iron Age metalled road, pottery, a bronze ringheaded pin, penannular brooch and currency bars, as well as a crouched burial. Internally aerial photographs show cropmarks which represent an extensive settlement, with rectilinear enclosures and round houses (seen as ring ditches). An extensive collection of flint artefacts, also found at the hillfort, points to an extensive pre-Iron Age settlement at Uley Bury.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uley_Bury

Land owner permission not required.

View and discuss this location on Grey Arrows.

Co-ordinates: 51.68847, -2.313108 • what3words: ///storeroom.relaxed.destiny

Uley Long Barrow (By clinkadink)

Parking and TOAL was from a lay-by off the B4066, South East of the site.

Uley Long Barrow is a partially reconstructed Neolithic chambered mound. It is 37 metres long and overlooks the Severn Valley. It's known locally as Hetty Pegler's Tump, after Hester Pegler who owned the land in the 17th century.

The barrow as seen today is largely the result of the excavation and reconstruction undertaken by Dr John Thurnham in 1854 and subsequent repairs in 1871, 1891 and 1906.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uley_Long_Barrow

Land owner permission not required.

View and discuss this location on Grey Arrows.

Co-ordinates: 51.69864, -2.305888 • what3words: ///grafted.picked.gripes

Coaley Peak (By clinkadink)

Parking is free at the site, TOAL was from the grassy area next to the car park.

Coaley Peak is a picnic site and viewpoint in the English county of Gloucestershire. Located about 4 miles south-west of the town of Stroud overlooking the village of Coaley, Coaley Peak offers 12 acres of reclaimed farmland with views over the Severn Vale and the Forest of Dean.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coaley_Peak

Land owner permission not required.

View and discuss this location on Grey Arrows.

Co-ordinates: 51.70851, -2.298946 • what3words: ///mice.tastings.dissolve

The Old Prison (By clinkadink)

Parking and TOAL was from their car park.

The Old Prison, formerly a 'House of Correction', is a fascinating 18th Century building in the Cotswold market town of Northleach and a historic visitor attraction.

Built in the 1790s, this was once a fine example of a model prison used to inspire better care and rehabilitation of prisoners throughout Britain and further afield. It even served as a blueprint for London's Pentonville Prison.

The keeper's house, police station and perimeter wall still survive, as do the female prison cells and court room, both of which can be viewed free of charge.

Today The Old Prison operates as a prestigious Kitchen & Cafe, operated by the renowned Hospitality and Catering company Relish, serving artisan coffees, brunch, lunch, seasonal dinners and homemade cakes.

Customers to The Old Prison Cafe are offered complimentary access to the original Prison Cells and Court Room, plus the Exercise Yard which is now a fully enclosed garden and houses the unique Lloyd Baker Rural Life Collection - the largest publicly owned regional collection of agricultural 'bygones' in the country. Wheelchair access to cafe only. Ample free parking available.

Land owner permission not required.

View and discuss this location on Grey Arrows.

Co-ordinates: 51.83305, -1.843286 • what3words: ///shocked.hiked.motored

Salmonsbury Camp (By clinkadink)

Parking was outside of Greystones Farm by the Cemetery. TOAL was just outside the Rissington FRZ. So if you are planning to fly here, be very careful. A third of the site crosses over into the FRZ.

On the outskirts of Bourton-on-the-Water, in the heart of the Cotswolds, lies an extraordinary historic site combining an Iron Age fort and town, a nature reserve and Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI).

Within the Greystones Farm Nature Reserve, managed by the Gloucestershire Wildlife Trust, lies an archaeological site of national importance. Salmonsbury Camp is a prehistoric earthwork enclosure erected in the Neolithic period, over 6,000 years ago.

The site was occupied throughout the late Neolithic period, the Bronze Age, the Iron Age, the Roman period and the Dark Ages, until it was finally abandoned in the 5th-century AD. The first evidence of human habitation is a large Neolithic causewayed enclosure, established as early as 4,000 BC.

The Neolithic enclosure was not a permanent settlement but a meeting place or ceremonial centre, perhaps a place to worship, trade, or feast.

The causewayed enclosure is made up of roughly concentric ditches and banks around a central area. The ditches are not continuous but are fragmented into short lengths. Similar enclosures in other places have revealed bones and pieces of pottery in the ditches, but no such remains have been found at Salmonsbury.

Roughly 3,000 years after the causewayed camp was built, around 100 BC, a hillfort was constructed, probably by the Dobunni tribe, who controlled this region. Given its low-lying location it seems clear the hillfort was not built for defence, but as a focal point for administration, trade, and community. The hillfort was defended by double ramparts made of gravel, braced by drystone walls.

The Iron Age settlement was only in existence for 150 years when the Romans arrived in Britain. Under the Romans, the focus of settlement shifted west. The hillfort was not abandoned completely, however, until sometime around 420 AD. After the Romans departed, the Anglo-Saxon settlement of Bourton grew up outside the fort's ramparts.

https://www.gloucestershirewildlifetrust.co.uk/nature-reserves/greystones-farm

Land owner permission not required.

View and discuss this location on Grey Arrows.

Co-ordinates: 51.88615, -1.746899 • what3words: ///unhappily.whips.snappy

Kinver Rock Houses + Hillfort (By ensignvorik)

Limited free Parking is available at the marker on the map. Please park responsibly. TOAL is also from the footpath on the road outside of NT land. Keep flying upwards and you'll also be able to get good views of the hill fort.

Be aware that despite not being on the maps, there is a flight school around here so keep an ear and eyes out for low flying light aircraft.

Land owner permission requirements unknown.

View and discuss this location on Grey Arrows.

Co-ordinates: 52.45052, -2.242492 • what3words: ///grazes.sweetened.passing


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